zbMATH — the first resource for mathematics

Examples
Geometry Search for the term Geometry in any field. Queries are case-independent.
Funct* Wildcard queries are specified by * (e.g. functions, functorial, etc.). Otherwise the search is exact.
"Topological group" Phrases (multi-words) should be set in "straight quotation marks".
au: Bourbaki & ti: Algebra Search for author and title. The and-operator & is default and can be omitted.
Chebyshev | Tschebyscheff The or-operator | allows to search for Chebyshev or Tschebyscheff.
"Quasi* map*" py: 1989 The resulting documents have publication year 1989.
so: Eur* J* Mat* Soc* cc: 14 Search for publications in a particular source with a Mathematics Subject Classification code (cc) in 14.
"Partial diff* eq*" ! elliptic The not-operator ! eliminates all results containing the word elliptic.
dt: b & au: Hilbert The document type is set to books; alternatively: j for journal articles, a for book articles.
py: 2000-2015 cc: (94A | 11T) Number ranges are accepted. Terms can be grouped within (parentheses).
la: chinese Find documents in a given language. ISO 639-1 language codes can also be used.

Operators
a & b logic and
a | b logic or
!ab logic not
abc* right wildcard
"ab c" phrase
(ab c) parentheses
Fields
any anywhere an internal document identifier
au author, editor ai internal author identifier
ti title la language
so source ab review, abstract
py publication year rv reviewer
cc MSC code ut uncontrolled term
dt document type (j: journal article; b: book; a: book article)
Hermite interpolation by Pythagorean hodograph quintics. (English) Zbl 0847.68125
Summary: The Pythagorean hodograph (PH) curves are polynomial parametric curves {x(t),y(t)} whose hodograph (derivative) components satisfy the Pythagorean condition x '2 (t)+y '2 (t)σ 2 (t) for some polynomial σ(t). Thus, unlike polynomial curves in general, PH curves have arc lengths and offset curves that admit exact rational representations. The lowest-order PH curves that are sufficiently flexible for general interpolation/approximation problems are the quintics. While the PH quintics are capable of matching arbitrary first-order Hermite data, the solution procedure is not straightforward and furthermore does not yield a unique result – there are always four distinct interpolants (of which only one, in general, has acceptable “shape” characteristics). We show that formulating PH quintics as complex-valued functions of a real parameter leads to a compact Hermite interpolation algorithm and facilitates an identification of the “good” interpolant (in terms of minimizing the absolute rotation number). This algorithm establishes the PH quintics as a viable medium for the design or approximation of free-form curves, and allows a one-for-one substitution of PH quintics in lieu of the widely-used “ordinary” cubics.
MSC:
68U07Computer aided design
53A04Curves in Euclidean space
68U05Computer graphics; computational geometry
41A05Interpolation (approximations and expansions)