zbMATH — the first resource for mathematics

Examples
Geometry Search for the term Geometry in any field. Queries are case-independent.
Funct* Wildcard queries are specified by * (e.g. functions, functorial, etc.). Otherwise the search is exact.
"Topological group" Phrases (multi-words) should be set in "straight quotation marks".
au: Bourbaki & ti: Algebra Search for author and title. The and-operator & is default and can be omitted.
Chebyshev | Tschebyscheff The or-operator | allows to search for Chebyshev or Tschebyscheff.
"Quasi* map*" py: 1989 The resulting documents have publication year 1989.
so: Eur* J* Mat* Soc* cc: 14 Search for publications in a particular source with a Mathematics Subject Classification code (cc) in 14.
"Partial diff* eq*" ! elliptic The not-operator ! eliminates all results containing the word elliptic.
dt: b & au: Hilbert The document type is set to books; alternatively: j for journal articles, a for book articles.
py: 2000-2015 cc: (94A | 11T) Number ranges are accepted. Terms can be grouped within (parentheses).
la: chinese Find documents in a given language. ISO 639-1 language codes can also be used.

Operators
a & b logic and
a | b logic or
!ab logic not
abc* right wildcard
"ab c" phrase
(ab c) parentheses
Fields
any anywhere an internal document identifier
au author, editor ai internal author identifier
ti title la language
so source ab review, abstract
py publication year rv reviewer
cc MSC code ut uncontrolled term
dt document type (j: journal article; b: book; a: book article)
Finite automata. (English) Zbl 1086.68074
Boca Raton, FL: Chapman and Hall/CRC (ISBN 1-58488-255-7/hbk). xii, 307 p. $ 69.95; £ 39.99 (2004).

Publisher’s description: Interest in finite automata theory continues to grow, not only because of its applications in computer science, but also because of more recent applications in mathematics, particularly group theory and symbolic dynamics. The subject itself lies on the boundaries of mathematics and computer science, and with a balanced approach that does justice to both aspects, this book provides a well-motivated introduction to the mathematical theory of finite automata.

The first half of the book focuses on the computer science side of the theory and culminates in Kleene’s Theorem, which the author proves in a variety of ways to suit both computer scientists and mathematicians. In the second half, the focus shifts to the mathematical side of the theory and constructing an algebraic approach to languages. Here the author proves two main results: Schützenberger’s Theorem on star-free languages and the variety theorem of Eilenberg and Schützenberger.

Accessible even to students with only a basic knowledge of discrete mathematics, this treatment develops the underlying algebra gently but rigorously, and nearly 200 exercises reinforce the concepts. Whether your students’ interests lie in computer science or mathematics, the well organized and flexible presentation of the book provides a route to understanding that you can tailor to their particular tastes and abilities.

MSC:
68Q45Formal languages and automata
68Q70Algebraic theory of languages and automata
68-01Textbooks (computer science)