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Enumerations of the Kolmogorov function. (English) Zbl 1165.03025
Summary: A recursive enumerator for a function \(h\) is an algorithm \(f\) which enumerates for an input \(x\) finitely many elements including \(h(x)\). \(f\) is a \(k(n)\)-enumerator if for every input \(x\) of length \(n\), \(h(x)\) is among the first \(k(n)\) elements enumerated by \(f\). If there is a \(k(n)\)-enumerator for \(h\) then \(h\) is called \(k(n)\)-enumerable. We also consider enumerators which are only \(A\)-recursive for some oracle \(A\).
We determine exactly how hard it is to enumerate the Kolmogorov function, which assigns to each string \(x\) its Kolmogorov complexity:
{\(\bullet\)} For every underlying universal machine \(U\), there is a constant \(a\) such that \(C\) is \(k(n)\)-enumerable only if \(k(n) \geq n/a\) for almost all \(n\).
{\(\bullet\)} For any given constant \(k\), the Kolmogorov function is \(k\)-enumerable relative to an oracle \(A\) if and only if \(A\) is at least as hard as the halting problem.
{\(\bullet\)} There exists an r.e., Turing-incomplete set \(A\) such that for every non-decreasing and unbounded recursive function \(k\) the Kolmogorov function is \(k(n)\)-enumerable relative to \(A\).
The last result is obtained by using a relativizable construction for a nonrecursive set \(A\) relative to which the prefix-free Kolmogorov complexity differs only by a constant from the unrelativized prefix-free Kolmogorov complexity.
Although every 2-enumerator for \(C\) is Turing-hard for \(K\), we show that reductions must depend on the specific choice of the 2-enumerator and there is no bound on the quantity of their queries. We show our negative results even for strong 2-enumerators as an oracle where the querying machine for any \(x\) gets directly an explicit list of all hypotheses of the enumerator for this input. The limitations are very general and we show them for any recursively bounded function \(g\):
{\(\bullet\)} For every Turing reduction \(M\) and every non-recursive set \(B\), there is a strong 2-enumerator \(f\) for \(g\) such that \(M\) does not Turing-reduce \(B\) to \(f\).
{\(\bullet\)} For every non-recursive set \(B\), there is a strong 2-enumerator \(f\) for \(g\) such that \(B\) is not wtt-reducible to \(f\).
Furthermore, we deal with the resource-bounded case and give characterizations for the class \(\text{S}_2^{\text{p}}\), introduced by Canetti and independently by Russell and Sundaram, and the classes PSPACE, EXP.
{\(\bullet\)} \(\text{S}_2^{\text{p}}\) is the class of all sets \(A\) for which there is a polynomially bounded function \(g\) such that there is a polynomial-time tt-reduction which reduces \(A\) to every strong 2-enumerator for \(g\).
{\(\bullet\)} PSPACE is the class of all sets \(A\) for which there is a polynomially bounded function \(g\) such that there is a polynomial-time Turing reduction which reduces \(A\) to every strong 2-enumerator for \(g\). Interestingly, \(g\) can be taken to be the Kolmogorov function for the conditional space-bounded Kolmogorov complexity.
{\(\bullet\)} EXP is the class of all sets \(A\) for which there is a polynomially bounded function \(g\) and a machine \(M\) which witnesses \(A \in \text{PSPACE}^f\) for all strong 2-enumerators \(f\) for \(g\).
Finally, we show that any strong \(O(\log n)\)-enumerator for the conditional space-bounded Kolmogorov function must be PSPACE-hard if \(\text{P}=\text{NP}\).

MSC:
03D80 Applications of computability and recursion theory
68Q15 Complexity classes (hierarchies, relations among complexity classes, etc.)
68Q30 Algorithmic information theory (Kolmogorov complexity, etc.)
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