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Flow and mass transfer on a stretching sheet with a magnetic field and chemically reactive species. (English) Zbl 1210.76205

Summary: An analysis has been carried out to obtain the flow and mass transfer characteristics of a viscous electrically conducting fluid on a continuously stretching surface with non-zero slot velocity. The motion is caused solely by the stretching surface which introduces non-similarity in the velocity and concentration fields. The partial differential equations governing the boundary layer flow and mass transfer are solved by using an implicit finite-difference scheme. The magnetic field significantly increases the surface skin friction, but slightly reduces the surface mass transfer. The surface mass transfer strongly depends on the Schmidt number and the reaction rate and it increases with their increasing values. The surface mass transfer for the first-order reaction is more than that for the second- or-third-order reaction.

MSC:

76V05 Reaction effects in flows
76M20 Finite difference methods applied to problems in fluid mechanics
80A20 Heat and mass transfer, heat flow (MSC2010)
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References:

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